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Police Department

The mission of the Springfield Police Department is to work in partnership with the community to provide service and in accordance with the framework of the Constitution, to enforce the law, preserve the peace, protect lives and property, lessen fear and enhance the quality of life of all within our community. Our mandate is to perform our mission with honor and integrity, while always conducting ourselves with the highest ethical standards to uphold public confidence.
John Cook, Police Chief John.Cook@springfield-nj.us
Springfield Police Department 100 Mountain Avenue (entrance on South Trivett Avenue)
Springfield, New Jersey 07081-1729
Phone: 973- 376-0400
Fax: 973-912-0538
police@springfield-nj.us

Springfield Police Department
The Springfield Township Police Department, within the Public Safety Department, maintains order, preserves and protects the lives, peace and property of the citizens of Springfield and to enforce the laws within the framework of the United States Constitution

The Police:

  • Vigorously patrol the municipality and enforce the laws of the State of New Jersey and the ordinances of the County of Union and Township of Springfield.
  • Investigate and prepare for prosecution the crimes that take place in the Township with the utmost professionalism.
  • Investigations are preformed with passion and without prejudice to one’s ethnicity, race, creed, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, handicap, or religious beliefs.
  • The Patrol Bureau is comprised of five squads. These squads are run by sergeants who are the direct supervisors. The Watch Commanders, with supervision and management responsibility of these squads are Lieutenant William Cieri and Lieutenant Damon Quirk.
  • The Investigations and Administration Bureau is comprised of the Detective Bureau and the Special Services Unit. The Special Services Unit, supervised by traffic specialist, Sgt. Jon Rachel, consists of an Accreditation Manager, an Administrative Assistant, and DARE Officers.
  • The Investigations Bureau is supervised by Detective Lieutenant Judd Levenson.

Core Values
The employees of the Springfield Township Police Department are committed to its mission. We are accountable for our actions and we conduct ourselves accordingly in pursuit of our core values of respect, fairness, and sensitivity.
Respect:
We will earn the trust, respect and support of the citizens through active partnership, involvement and service to the community we serve. All employees of this department will treat each other with dignity and courtesy regardless of position or assignment. This will also hold true for the community we serve. By demonstrating respect for others, we will earn the respect of our community.
Fairness:
We treat all persons in a dignified manner and exhibit understanding of ethnic and cultural diversity both in our professional and personal endeavors. We have committed ourselves to elevated standards of trust, responsibility and discipline while promoting justice in a fair and impartial manner. We guarantee to uphold the principles and values embodied in the Constitution of the United States and the State of New Jersey.
Sensitivity:
We must be sincere to the need of those who are concerned for their safety, require guidance and information, or are unable to provide for themselves. We will show concern and empathy for the victims of crime and treat violators of the law with fairness and dignity.

Animal Control
The Township of Springfield has entered into a shared services agreement with the Township of Millburn to provide animal control services to the Township of Springfield. The Animal Control Officer investigates stray dogs and cats, animal bites and wildlife problems. Rabies immunizations for dogs and cats are also provided from the Township. For more information please call the Township Registrar at 973.912.2285. To report any animal control issues, please call the Springfield Police non-emergency number at 973.376.0400.
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EMPLOYMENT

The Springfield Police Department in Union County, NJ is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we are currently looking for people who wish to serve their community as full time Probationary Police Officers. Applications must be picked up, in person, at Police Headquarters, 100 Mountain Avenue, Springfield, NJ 07081.

All applicants must have the following qualifications, as a minimum, for employment consideration:

> Must be a resident of New Jersey and a citizen of the United States;
> Must be at least 21 years of age;
> Shall have an associate’s degree or higher from a recognized college/university in an accredited course of study and/or a combination of active military service time and/or college/university credits;
> Have the ability to perform all the tasks and duties of a Police Officer;
> Possess a valid New Jersey driver’s license;
> No indictable criminal history conviction and of good moral character.
> Must meet educational and/or active military service time requirements set forth by the N.J. Police Training Commission for candidates to be eligible for the alternate route program.

All applications and resumes must be made to the attention of the Chief of Police, and must be submitted to Captain P. McLaughlin c/o the Springfield Police Department no later than June 26, 2015 at 4 PM.
________________________________________________________

Special Services


Project Medicine Drop

In December 2014, Springfield Police Chief John Cook announced that Springfield has joined the New Jersey Attorney General’s “Project Medicine Drop” initiative, and has installed a permanent Project Medicine Drop box in the lobby at police headquarters, 100 Mountain Avenue. Residents may visit the Springfield Police Department at any time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to dispose of their unused, excess or expired prescription medications anonymously and with no questions asked. This permanent drop box makes it easier and more convenient than ever for Springfield residents to take an active role in the fight against the nationwide epidemic of opiate and heroin abuse, which often is fueled by the abuse of prescription painkillers.

  • Only household medications will be accepted.
  • Pills, capsules, patches, and pet medications are acceptable.
  • Liquids are acceptable provided they are securely held in either a bottle or other type of container.
  • Mail, trash or syringes are not acceptable (please see the Safe Syringe Disposal Guide at http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/documents/safe_syringe_disposal.pdf).

The Police Department also has a mobile drop box that can be brought to locations throughout the township for the convenience of residents. An example is the take-back day held on February 12, 2015 in the Senior Meeting Room at the Chisholm Community Center.

Special Project Medicine Drop Take-Back Days are held throughout the year and are announced on the Township website.

Project Medicine Drop is an important component of the New Jersey Attorney General’s effort to stop the diversion and abuse of prescription drugs, including highly addictive opiate painkillers. Through this initiative, the State Division of Consumer Affairs installs secure “prescription drug drop boxes” at police departments, sheriff’s offices, and State Police barracks across New Jersey, allowing citizens to safely dispose of their unused, excess, or expired prescription medications. This initiative also protects New Jersey’s environment by keeping these drugs out of landfills and out of the water supply. More information about Project Medicine Drop, including the full list of Project Medicine Drop locations, can be found at http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca2/meddrop/.


Firearms

FIREARMS APPLICATION PROCESS AND REQUIREMENTS

In order to obtain a firearm in the State of New Jersey, you must complete the forms listed below.

These forms are also available at the Springfield Police Department Record Bureau, located on the second floor of the Springfield Municipal Building, at 100 Mountain Avenue. All applicants must be residents of Springfield in order for the Springfield Police Department to process your request. A current New Jersey Driver’s License showing residency in the Township of Springfield must be presented at the time applications are submitted. Be advised that an application for a Firearms Identification Card requires the applicant to submit to a background investigation at both the State and Federal level, submission of fingerprints (see below information on the fingerprinting process), supply personal references, and consent to a mental health records check. The Springfield Police Department must rely on other State and Federal agencies to return your background investigation information. Please allow an average of twelve to fourteen weeks to process all firearms applications. A Firearms Identification Card is required for the ownership of a handgun/pistol, or shotgun/rifle, as well as the purchase of ammunition. Ownership of a handgun/pistol requires a permit as well. If this is your first time applying, and you wish to also purchase a handgun, you may apply for both the Firearms Identification Card and the Permit to Purchase simultaneously. Please refer to the guide below to determine which forms are required for your needs.

Form STS-33

This application must be completed in duplicate by ALL FIREARMS APPLICANTS. The form is used for first time applicants, as well as applicants who have already obtained an Identification card, but would like a permit to purchase a handgun. This form also is used for address changes, lost, stolen, or damaged cards, or name changes.

Upon completion, please remember that 2 original signatures are required on each form. Do not photocopy a signature.

Form STS-33 Download (.pdf)

Form SP-66

This form is also to be completed in duplicate by ALL FIREARMS APPLICANTS.
This form is the Consent for Mental Health Records Search which allows authorities to look into whether you were ever hospitalized due to a mental health issue. Please remember that this form also requires that original signatures are on each of the 2 forms required.
Do not photocopy a signature.

Form SP-66 Download (.pdf)

PLEASE TYPE ALL FILLABLE FIELDS ON APPLICATIONS, PRINT THE COMPLETED APPLICATION, AND ADD YOUR SIGNATURE IN THE APPROPRIATE FIELD.

This enables the Department to process your application more efficiently.

First-time Firearms ID Card Applicants

First time Firearms Identification Card Applicants must be fingerprinted. Previous fingerprint submissions for employment, etc, are not accepted as part of the Firearms Identification Card application process. The Springfield Police Department does not handle fingerprinting of applicants. When your forms are completed, please bring them to the Record Bureau and you will be provided with a Morpho Trak form and an applicant number specifically assigned to you, which you will need to be fingerprinted. Morpho Trak handles the fingerprinting process for all applicants. Information on nearby fingerprinting locations, cost, as well as their contact information can be found on this form as well. Morpho Trak forms are maintained in the Record Bureau and cannot be obtained online, as applicants are assigned individual applicant numbers.

Current Firearms ID Card Holders

If you already possess a firearms identification card and wish to apply for a permit to purchase a handgun, or make any changes to your current identification card, you must also submit form SBI 212A. This is a request for criminal history search, used in lieu of fingerprint submissions.

**please note changes to the submission of form 212A**

As of March 1, 2015, the state of New Jersey will no longer accept paper 212A forms. All 212A forms must be submitted electronically by the applicant. Information on how to submit this form electronically will be provided by the police records bureau upon submission of the required paper documents.

Fees:
Firearms ID card (first time applicant): $5.00 Permit to Purchase: $2.00 per permit These fees may be paid in cash or by personal check payable to the Township of Springfield. If you need further assistance or have questions regarding the application process, please contact the Springfield Police Department Record Bureau at (973) 912-2239. The Record Bureau is open Monday thru Friday from 8:00am – 4:00pm.

Firearms Form Downloads (right click, then save as):

 


Auto Theft

CRIME PREVENTION TIPS…

DON’T MAKE IT EASY FOR A THIEF TO… STEAL YOUR WHEELS

One vehicle is stolen every twenty (20) seconds in the United States. Stolen cars, vans, trucks, and motorcycles cost victims time and money — and increase everyone’s insurance premiums. They’re also often used to commit other crimes. Don’t become a victim of this serious crime…

The Basic Prevention Policy…

  • Never leave your car running or the keys in the ignition when you’re away from it, even if its “just for a minute.”
  • Always roll up the windows and lock your car, even if it’s in front of your house.
  • Never leave valuables in plain view, even if your car is locked. Put them in the trunk or at least out of sight. Buy radios, tape and CD players that can be removed and stored in the trunk.
  • Park in busy, well-lighted areas.
  • Carry the registration and insurance card with you. Don’t leave personal identification documents or credit cards in your vehicle.
  • When you pay to park in a lot or garage, leave just the ignition key with the attendant. Make sure no personal information is attached. Do the same when you take your car for repairs.

What About Carjacking??

Carjacking — stealing a car by force — has captured headlines in the last few years. Statistically, your chances of being a carjacking victim are very slim, and preventive actions can reduce the risk even more…

  • Approach your car with the key in hand. Look around and inside before getting in.
  • When driving, keep your car doors locked and windows rolled up at all times.
  • Be especially alert at intersections, gas stations, ATMs, shopping malls, convenience and grocery stores — all windows of opportunity for carjackers.
  • Park in well-lighted areas with good visibility, close to walkways, stores, and people.
  • If the carjacker has a weapon, give up the car with no questions asked. Your life is worth more than your car.


Child Safety Seats

Child Safety Seats

New Jersey’s child passenger safety law requires the following:

Children up to age 8 or 80 pounds must ride in a safety or booster seat in the rear seat of the vehicle. If there is no rear seat, the child must sit in the front seat secured by a safety or booster seat.

  • Children under age 8 who weigh more than 80 pounds must wear a seat belt anywhere in the vehicle
  • Passengers age 8 to 18 (regardless of weight) must wear a seat belt anywhere inside a vehicle.
  • It’s recommended that all children under the age of 13 years be seated in the rear seat with proper restraints.

search_internetChild Seat Recall List Certified Child Passenger Safety Technician Locator


Call Before You Dig

Call Before You Dig. It’s The Law.

Call 1-800-272-1000 before you dig

Underground utilities exist everywhere, perhaps even on your own property. Digging can cause disruption of vital utility services and result in costly delays, expensive repairs, environmental or property damage, personal liability, injury, and even loss of life.{

Whether you plan to plant a tree or new garden; put in a sprinkler system, mailbox post or fencing; install ground rods for electrical systems; or excavate for a home addition, you need to call beforehand to know where it’s safe to dig. For your own well-being and the safety of our underground utilities, call 1-800-272-1000 before you dig. It’s the law. We ask that you take the following into consideration:

  • Call Before You Dig: At least FOUR full business days before digging starts, call 811 or 1-800-272-1000 for a free markout of underground gas, water, cable, telephone and electric utility lines.
  • Wait the Required Time: Wait three full business days after calling before doing any digging. Underground utilities will be marked with paint, flags or stakes. If the site does not have underground utilities, you will be notified.
  • Respect the Marks: Always hand-dig and locate underground utilities within two feet of marked lines.
  • Dig With Care: Making the call before you dig will help prevent property damage and potential injuries. Please be sure to dig safely.

For more information please go to the PSEG Safety page


Seat Belt Use

Seat Belt Use

“The police department now offers child seat inspections by certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians. Please call 973-376-0400 or 973-921-1996 to make an appointment or for other inquiries.”

  • Studies show seat belts do save lives and reduce injuries during crashes.
  • Seat belts work with air bags to protect occupants. Air bags alone are not enough to safeguard occupants.
  • More than 2,000 unbuckled drivers and front seat passengers died on New Jersey’s roadways in the past 10 years.
  • Approximately 700 unbuckled drivers and front seat passengers were thrown out of their vehicles during crashes and killed in the past 10 years.

New Jersey’s Seat Belt Law: (NJS 39:3-76.2f)

  • Applies to all passenger vehicles including vans, pickup trucks and SUV’s, that are required to be equipped with seat belts.
  • Applies to all passengers, who are at least 8 years of age but less than 18 years of age, and each driver and front seat passenger of a passenger automobile, operated on a street or highway. All occupants are required to wear a properly adjusted and fastened seat belt system.
  • Makes the driver responsible for proper seat beltuse by all occupants who are under the age of 18.


Motorcycle Safety

Motorcycle Safety

Nationwide, motorcycle fatalities are on the rise. Between 1999 and 2003, a nearly 50-percent increase in motorcycle-related fatalities occurred. About 2,500 motorcycles are involved in crashes each year on New Jersey’s roadways, according to the Federal Highway Authority.

Fact: Motorcycle crashes result in 50 or more fatalities and about 2,000 injuries each year in the Garden state. If you’re involved in a motorcycle crash in New Jersey, statistics show that you have a 75 percent chance of being injured. Every rider’s best defense against injury is to obey the law: Wear Your Helmet! New Jersey Helmet Law – P.L. 39:3- 76.7: No person shall operate or ride upon a motorcycle unless he/she wears a securely fitted protective helmet of a size proper for that person and of a type approved by the federal DOT. Such a helmet must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap and be reflectorized on both sides.

Other Motorcycle-related NJ Laws: Handlebars must rest below rider’s shoulders and a rearview mirror is required.

motorcycleSafety Tips for Motorcyclists:
  • Drive Defensively – Assume motorists do not see you and plan escape routes.
  • Make Yourself Visible – Wear bright colored and reflective clothing. Do not linger in “blind spots”.
  • Give Yourself Time and Space to React – Do not tailgate.
  • Avoid Sudden Braking or Turning When Driving on Wet Roads or Gravel
  • vEnhance Your Skills with Education – New Jersey offers various safety and skill courses, for riders new and old.

View more information, or call 609-633-9308. Safety Tips for Motorists:

  • Be Alert for Motorcycles – Heavy traffic could hide a motorcycle.
  • Anticipate Hazards for Motorcycles – Be prepared to react to poor road conditions, such as debris or oil slicks, railroad tracks or raised manhole covers.
  • Do Not Tailgate Motorcycles – They require less stopping distance than other vehicles.
  • Share the Road – Sharing the road will save lives. Motorcyclists and motorists abide by the same traffic laws.

Handlebars must rest below rider’s shoulders and a rearview mirror is required.


Drivers License Programs

New Enhanced Drivers License

New Graduated Driver License (GDL) Laws

On May 1, 2010 the requirements for all teens (16-20 years of age) holding a permit or probationary license under New Jersey’s Graduated Driver License (GDL) Law will change. To ensure that GDL holders comply with the law, they and their parents should be aware that the teen driver now must follow the restrictions listed below:

  • may not be on the road between 11:01 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • may transport only one passenger in the vehicle besides his/her dependents. (The passenger restriction is waived if a parent or guardian is in the vehicle.)
  • may not use a cell phone (hand-held or hands-free), ipod, or other wireless electronic device. (GPS systems and ipods connected to a vehicle’s sound system are permitted, but a teen shall not make any adjustments to them while driving.)
  • must ensure that all vehicle occupants are properly restrained in child safety seats or seat belts.
  • must display a decal on the front and rear license plate.
  • may not plea bargain any point carrying offenses.
  • There is NO grandfathering of existing GDL holders. Regardless of how much time a GDL holder has remaining on his/her GDL, they must abide by these requirements as of May 1st. In addition, the name of the provisional license has changed to probationary license.

Additional information can be found at http://www.njteendriving.com/gdldecal-faqs or http://www.nj.gov/oag/hts/dont-drive-stupid_resources.html.

NJ Graduated Driver’s License Program

If you are under 21 years old or have never had a driver license, New Jersey requires that you complete a period of supervised driving before getting a basic driver license. MVC’s Graduated Driver License (GDL) program introduces driving privileges in phases.

GDL definitions
Special learners permit driving restrictions

  • No driving between 12:01 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hand held electronic device
  • You must be accompanied by an Adult Supervising Driver (at least 21 years old and licensed to drive for at least 3 years) in the front seat
  • Passengers must be from your household. Only one additional person from outside your household is allowed.
  • Seatbelts must be worn at all times.

Examination permit restrictions

  • You must be at least 17 years old and not in suspension status
  • No driving between 12:01 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • You must be accompanied by an Adult Supervising Driver (at least 21 years old and licensed to drive for at least 3 years) in the front seat
  • Passengers must be from your household. Only one additional person from outside your household is allowed in the vehicle
  • If you are at least 21 years old, there are no passenger or hour restrictions
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hand held electronic device
  • Seatbelts must be worn at all times

Provisional driver license restrictions

  • No driving between 12:01 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Passengers must be from your household. Only one additional person from outside your household is allowed in the vehicle
  • If you are at least 21 years old, there are no passenger or hour restrictions
  • You can’t use cell phones, hand held video games or any other hand held electronic device

GDL Exemptions
All drivers under 21 that wish to apply for hours-related exemptions for employment or religious reasons must provide legible documentation on letterhead signed by employer, organization or religious institution stating the reasons for this request Include signature, title, address and telephone number of designated official Visit http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/Licenses/FirstTime.htm

Parent Resource

Recognizing that an informed parent plays a key role in keeping teens and young adults safe on our roads, this new website, developed by the Brain Injury Association of New Jersey, through funding from DHTS, will help to further educate parents about the risks associated with teen driving. Relevant legislation, videos, an interactive teen crash site map, traffic safety tips, and GDL information can be found on the site.


Move Over Law

Move Over Law

MoveOverLawAnimationOn January 27,2009, Governor Jon S. Corzine signed into law a bill that requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles, tow trucks, and other highway safety vehicles displaying certain flashing lights to move over one lane or, if not safe to change lanes, then to slow down below the posted speed limit. Failure to move over or slow down is punishable by a fine of $100 to $500, but no points will be assessed for this offense. For a complete copy of the law, visit http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2008/bills/P L09/5_.pdf


Work Zone Safety

Work Zone Safety

What is a work zone? A work zone is an area of a roadway with construction, maintenance, utility work, or incident management activities. A work zone is typically marked by signs, cones, drums, barriers, pavement markings, and/or work vehicles. It extends from the first warning sign to the End Road Work sign. Speed limits are often reduced in work zones to accommodate lane shifts and protect workers. Below are some safety tips to live by when driving through a work zone.

  • Stay Alert! Dedicate your full attention to the roadway.
  • Pay Close Attention! Signs and work zone flaggers save lives.
  • Turn on Your Headlights! Workers and other motorists must see you.
  • Don’t Tailgate! Rear end collisions are the most common crash in a work zone.
  • Don’t Speed! Note the posted speed limit in and around the work zone.
  • Keep Up with the Traffic Flow!
  • Don’t Change Lanes!
  • Minimize Distractions! Avoid changing radio stations and using mobile phones while driving in the work zone.
  • Expect the Unexpected! Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.
  • Be patient! Remember the work zone crew members are working to improve your future ride.

For additional New Jersey Work Zone information visit http://www.njcommuter.com


Pedestrian Safety Law

Pedestrian Safety

Beginning April 1, 2010, motorists who see pedestrian(s) in a marked crosswalk MUST: MOTORISTS in New Jersey MUST stop for pedestrians in a marked crosswalk. Failure to observe the law may subject you to one or more of the following: 2 POINTS $200 FINE (plus court costs) 15 DAYS COMMUNITY SERVICE

pedestrian_safety

INSURANCE SURCHARGES

NEW JERSEY STATUTE 39:4-36 Driver to stop for pedestrian: exceptions, violations. penalties.

A. The driver of a vehicle must stop and stay stopped for a pedestrian crossing the roadway within any marked crosswalk, but shall yield the right-of-way to a pedestrian crossing the roadway within an unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, except at crosswalks when the movement of traffic is being regulated by police officers or traffic control signals, or where otherwise prohibited by municipal, county, or State regulation, and except where a pedestrian tunnel or overhead pedestrian crossing has been provided, but no pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impossible for the driver to yield. Whenever any vehicle is stopped to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle. Every pedestrian upon a roadway at any point other than within a marked crosswalk or within an unmarked crosswalk at an intersection shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicles upon the roadway.

B. A person violating this section shall, upon conviction thereof, pay a fine to be imposed by the court in the amount of $200. The court may also impose a term of community service not to exceed 15 days. C. Of each fine imposed and collected pursuant to subsection B. of the section, $100 shall be forwarded to the State Treasurer who shall annually deposit the moneys into the “Pedestrian Safety Enforcement and Education Fund” created by section 1 of PL 2005, c 84 (C.39:4-36.2)

PEDESTRIANS MUST obey pedestrian signals and use crosswalks at signalized intersections. Both carry a $54.00 fine for failure to observe the law. (C.39:4-32 and 33) New Jersey experiences a disproportionate number of pedestrian injury crashes and fatalities compared to the nation as a whole. To combat the problem, the Division of Highway Traffic Safety assists local and county agencies in the development of comprehensive pedestrian safety programs involving Education, Enforcement, and Engineering. The Education component of the pedestrian program involves getting the pedestrian safety message to all members of the community, with a special emphasis on three high-risk groups: children, senior citizens and non-English speaking residents. The Enforcement component involves targeted police patrols at high pedestrian-crash locations in the community. During these patrols warnings and summonses are issued to motorists and pedestrians who’s actions put pedestrians at risk. Stop for pedestrian and jaywalking laws are emphasized. The Engineering component provides traffic engineering assistance such as enhanced crosswalk striping and signs. Comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Grants funded by the Division have been very successful. On average, participating municipalities have seen a [20-percent first year] reduction in crashes involving pedestrians. The most important pedestrian safety message for New Jersey residents is: Pedestrian Safety is a Shared Responsibility There is no one cause of crashes involving pedestrians. Pedestrians and motorists must both do their part to keep pedestrians safe.

Pedestrians:

  • Always cross at corners, within marked crosswalks where available.
  • If crossing in other locations, yield the right of way to vehicles. Failure to obey the law carries a $54 fine (court costs additional; C.39:4-32, 33) Look left, right and left again before crossing. Watch for turning cars.
  • Always walk facing traffic.
  • Obey traffic signals, especially “Walk/Don’t Walk.”
  • Remain alert! Don’t assume that cars are going to stop.
  • Wear reflective clothing when walking at night.
  • Stay sober. Walking while impaired greatly increases your chances of being struck.

Motorists:

  • Stop for pedestrians in marked crosswalks. Failure to stop carries a $200 (court costs additional) fine, a 2 point license penalty, 15 days community service, and insurance surcharges. (C.39:4-36)
  • Watch for pedestrians when turning right on red.
  • Obey speed limits.
  • Do not block or park in crosswalks.
  • Keep your windshield clean for maximum visibility.
  • Be alert for pedestrian at all times.

Children and senior citizens are at a higher risk of being struck by a motor vehicle. Special emphasis must be made to educate children and seniors about the importance of walking safely.

Children:

  • Cross at intersections only.
  • Never cross from in-between parked cars.
  • Before crossing, look left, right and left again and listen for traffic.
  • Always walk facing traffic.
  • Wear light colored or reflective clothing at night.
  • If there is no sidewalk available, walk as far off the roadway as possible on the left side of the road, facing oncoming traffic.
  • Obey all traffic signs and signals.

Seniors:

  • Walk on sidewalks and cross only at corners, within marked crosswalks where available.
  • If crossing in other locations, yield the right of way to vehicles. Failure to obey the law carries a $54 fine (court costs additional; C.39:4-32, 33)
  • Always walk facing traffic.
  • Wear bright-colored or reflective clothing, especially at night.
  • Look left, right and left again before crossing and be on the lookout for turning vehicles.
  • Make eye contact with the driver before crossing in front of a vehicle.
  • Learn the proper use of “Walk/Don’t Walk” signals.
  • Use the buddy system. Walk and cross with others when possible.
  • If possible do not walk at night or during bad weather such as snow, rain or ice.


Alcohol Awareness

Alcohol Awareness

ALCOHOL IS NUMBER ONE…

Alcohol is the number one drug of choice for teenagers. Alcohol related car crashes are the number one killer of teenagers in the United States. Alcohol is the number one drug problem in America. If you think it can’t happen to you, look around. Check your school’s yearbooks for the last ten years. How many have been dedicated to a student who was killed in a drunk driving crash? Ask your friends how many people they know who have had bad things happen to them while they were drinking. You don’t even have to be the one doing the drinking — most teenage passenger deaths are the result of alcohol-impaired teenage drivers. How Does Alcohol Affect You? You see double, speech slurs, you lose your sense of distance. Alcohol loosens inhibitions; you make bad judgements that can result in car crashes, unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, or rape. A significant proportion of violent crimes and vandalism among and by youth involve alcohol. Using alcohol can cost you your freedom. You can be grounded by parents, lose your driver’s license, or even end up in jail. Some More Facts About Alcohol Drinking coffee, taking a cold shower, or breathing fresh air will not sober you up. The only thing that sobers you up is time. One beer, one shot of whiskey, and one glass of wine all have the same amount of alcohol. Don’t fall for the notion that beer and wine are less intoxicating than hard liquors. Only 3-5% of alcoholics are what we think of as bums. Most alcoholics are just like people you know. Anyone can become an alcoholic — young, old, rich, poor, married, single, employed, or out of work. The earlier young people start drinking and using drugs, the more likely they are to become addicted. Alcohol ages and damages the brain. For Information… National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) P.O. Box 2345 Rockville, MD 20852 1-800-SAY-NO-TO, 1-301-468 -2600, 1-800-662-HELP


Cell Phone

Cell Phone Use Primary Offense

On Saturday, March 1, 2008, the amended law making it a primary motor vehicle offense for the operator of a motor vehicle to talk, text message, or send an electronic message with a hand-held wireless telephone or communication device took effect. This bill, which was signed into law by Governor Jon S. Corzine on November 2, 2007, establishes a $100.00 fine for a violation of this law. No points will be assessed for the offense. The amended law allows the operator of a motor vehicle to use a hand-held wireless telephone while driving with one hand on the steering wheel only for the following reasons: 1) The operator has reason to fear for his/her life or safety, or believes that a criminal act may be perpetrated against him/her or another; 2) the operator is using this device to report to appropriate authorities a fire, traffic crash, serious road hazard, medical or hazardous material emergency, or another motorist who is driving in a reckless, careless or otherwise unsafe manner or who appears to be driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Residents can go the Office of the Attorney General, Division of Highway Traffic Safety website, www.njsaferoads.com or the Springfield Police Department website, www.springfield-nj.us for details on the amended law. Download: Primary Cell Phone Law Summary


Special Services – DARE

The following links are just part of the Special Services Unit details. For more information contact Springfield Police Division via email at police@springfield-nj.us, check our website at www.springfield-nj.us/police, call our Main Desk at 973-376-0400.

Bike Registry

Bike Registry

The Springfield Police Division has partnered with the National Bike Registry (NBR) to help Springfield residents protect their bicycles in case they are stolen. Township ordinance requires that all bicycles be registered and display a license. The licenses are now good for ten years. Also included in the packet is a second label, at no additional charge, that can be used with any belongings you want to protect, such as a cell phone, laptop, keys, sports equipment, etc. Yearly registration is not neccessary. Once a license packet is purchased you can submit your registration by mail or online at www.boomerangit.com The NBR program gives the Springfield Police Division, as well as police departments nationwide, access to the extensive NBR registry so they can track down the rightful owners of bikes they recover. This registry now increases the chances that a stolen bicycle from Springfield will be matched to its owner no matter where it is recovered. If stolen, NBR registered bikes are 9 times more likely to be returned, than the national average. Each year, 1,500,000 bicycles are stolen nationwide and about half of them are recovered, but less than 2% are ever returned because there’s no way to link a bike to its owner. When a bicycle is labeled and registered in the NBR database, it can be easily identified by police and returned to its rightful owner. Every time a police officer has recovered a bike that was in the NBR database, they have been able to quickly identify the owner so that the bike could be returned. Additional information about the National Bike Registry can be found at www.nationalbikeregistry.com


Bike Safety

Bike Safety

Consider the following statistics from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety: In 2005, eighty-six percent of bicyclists killed reportedly were not wearing helmets.In 2005, 142 children under age 16 died in bike-related crashes.A bicycle is a vehicle, not a toy. This is why it’s so important to teach your kids bike safety as they enjoy their increased independence. Despite the sobering statistics cited above, it’s not all gloom and doom. Deaths among bicyclists younger than 16 have actually decreased by 79 percent since 1975. In 2005, this age group accounted for a little less than one-fifth of all bicycle-related deaths as compared to two-thirds in 1975. USE YOUR HEAD…WEAR A HELMET! New Jersey’s Bicycle Helmet Law Young people under the age of 17 are now required to wear an approved helmet when bicycling, roller skating, in-line skating or skateboarding. From the National Safety CouncilBike Safety TipsObey traffic rules. Get acquainted with ordinances. Cyclists must follow the same rules as motorists.Know your bike’s capabilities. Remember that bicycles differ from motor vehicles; they’re smaller and can’t move as fast. But, they can change direction more easily, stop faster and move through smaller spaces.Ride in single file with traffic, not against it. Bicycling two abreast can be dangerous. Bicyclists should stay as far right on the pavement as possible, watching for opening car doors, sewer gratings, soft shoulders, broken glass and other debris. Remember to keep a safe distance from the vehicle ahead.Make safe turns and cross intersections with care. Signal turns half a block before the intersection, using the correct hand signals (left arm straight out for left turn; forearm up for right turn). When traffic is heavy and the cyclist has to turn left, it is best to dismount and walk the bicycle across both streets at the crosswalks.Never hitch on cars. A sudden stop or turn could send the cyclist flying into the path of another vehicle.Before riding into traffic: stop, look left, right, left again, and over your shoulder.Always be seen. During the day, cyclists should wear bright clothing. Nighttime cycling is not advised, but if riding at night is necessary, retroreflective clothing, designed to bounce back motorists’ headlight beams, will make cyclists more visible.Make sure the bicycle has the right safety equipment: a red rear reflector; a white front reflector; a red or colorless spoke reflector on the rear wheel; an amber or colorless reflector on the front wheel; pedal reflectors; a horn or bell; and a rear view mirror. A bright headlight is recommended for night riding.Wear a helmet. Head injuries cause about 85 percent of all bicycling fatalities. The Council strongly urges all cyclists to wear helmets. The first body part to fly forward in a collision is usually the head, and with nothing but skin and bone to protect the brain from injury, the results can be disastrous.School or community groups interested in the police department’s bike safety program are invited to contact the Traffic Division for further information.

Consider the following statistics from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety:

  • In 2005, eighty-six percent of bicyclists killed reportedly were not wearing helmets.
  • In 2005, 142 children under age 16 died in bike-related crashes.
  • A bicycle is a vehicle, not a toy. This is why it’s so important to teach your kids bike safety as they enjoy their increased independence. Despite the sobering statistics cited above, it’s not all gloom and doom. Deaths among bicyclists younger than 16 have actually decreased by 79 percent since 1975. In 2005, this age group accounted for a little less than one- fifth of all bicycle-related deaths as compared to two-thirds in 1975.

USE YOUR HEAD…WEAR A HELMET! New Jersey’s Bicycle Helmet Law Young people under the age of 17 are now required to wear an approved helmet when bicycling, roller skating, in-line skating or skateboarding. From the National Safety Council Bike Safety Tips

  • Obey traffic rules. Get acquainted with ordinances. Cyclists must follow the same rules as motorists.
  • Know your bike’s capabilities. Remember that bicycles differ from motor vehicles; they’re smaller and can’t move as fast. But, they can change direction more easily, stop faster and move through smaller spaces.
  • Ride in single file with traffic, not against it. Bicycling two abreast can be dangerous. Bicyclists should stay as far right on the pavement as possible, watching for opening car doors, sewer gratings, soft shoulders, broken glass and other debris. Remember to keep a safe distance from the vehicle ahead.
  • Make safe turns and cross intersections with care. Signal turns half a block before the intersection, using the correct hand signals (left arm straight out for left turn; forearm up for right turn). When traffic is heavy and the cyclist has to turn left, it is best to dismount and walk the bicycle across both streets at the crosswalks.
  • Never hitch on cars. A sudden stop or turn could send the cyclist flying into the path of another vehicle.
  • Before riding into traffic: stop, look left, right, left again, and over your shoulder.
  • Always be seen. During the day, cyclists should wear bright clothing. Nighttime cycling is not advised, but if riding at night is necessary, retroreflective clothing, designed to bounce back motorists’ headlight beams, will make cyclists more visible.
  • Make sure the bicycle has the right safety equipment: a red rear reflector; a white front reflector; a red or colorless spoke reflector on the rear wheel; an amber or colorless reflector on the front wheel; pedal reflectors; a horn or bell; and a rear view mirror. A bright headlight is recommended for night riding.
  • Wear a helmet. Head injuries cause about 85 percent of all bicycling fatalities. The Council strongly urges all cyclists to wear helmets. The first body part to fly forward in a collision is usually the head, and with nothing but skin and bone to protect the brain from injury, the results can be disastrous.

Press Releases

Homeowners are advised that during the spring and summer months various types of con artists come into New Jersey and other northeastern states and target residents, usually senior citizens or the elderly. These criminal groups are referred to as “travelers” as they travel throughout the country committing any of a series of fraud schemes that can range from attempting to receive payment for home repairs that are not done or are done in a substandard fashion to attempting to con their way into a house to steal money or jewelry.

Home Repair Scams The homeowner is solicited at their house by persons claiming to be working in the area on driveway paving and they offer to repair or replace the victim’s driveway with the left over materials they have. The scam is where the fraudsters will either do limited cosmetic work by filling in cracks and they will then spray some type of mixture of black paint and oil to make it appear that the driveway was repaved. No contracts are used and the actors will usually request payment in cash or a check made payable to cash. In some cases the checks will be altered to a higher amount when cashed by the suspects. Homeowners, especially persons who recently purchased a house, will be solicited either by phone or at their door by persons claiming to represent some type of chimney cleaning service where the victim will be told that the prior homeowner had an annual contract to have the chimney inspected and/or cleaned. The inspection fee is always a small amount of money usually under $50.00. If the homeowner agrees to have the chimney inspected problems will always be found which will range from cracked chimney bricks or broken flashing on the roof to a blocked flue at the furnace, that victim is told will cause a life threatening build up of carbon monoxide in the house. When the victim agrees to having the repairs made, they cannot see if anything was done on the roof and in some cases the supposed work done to the furnace actually creates a problem where one had not existed.

Utility Imposter Scams Fraudsters pose as employees for a utility company to con their way into the house. They will use ruses such as needing to inspect water pipes in basement, or gas or electric and in some cases they will carry a clipboard with various papers and a $100 bill clipped to the top of the papers. The actors inform the victim they are receiving a rebate from whatever utility company the pretend to represent but the rebate is said to be only $80.00 and the actors require the victim to make change for the $100 bill. This is done so the actors can see where the victim goes inside the house to retrieve the money. In all utility imposter scams the actors will require the victim to bang on pipes under the kitchen sink or to accompany the worker into the basement. A second actor who was unseen but with the utility imposter will then enter the house and search rooms to steal money and jewelry. The utility companies never issue any type of rebate by having someone bring cash to a house and utility company employees will have a visible photo ID card issued by the company they work for. Lastly, utility companies call or send letters to customers if an employee needs to come to a house for any type of problem or routine inspection.

Homeowner Distraction Scams These are scams where the actor will attempt to lure a resident outside of their home and into the rear yard in the hopes the victim leaves the front door open or they will attempt to con their way into the home so that one actor can go to bedrooms to steal money and jewelry. Most common are males claiming to be doing work at a neighbor’s yard and they need to ask a question about a tree or other object in the rear yard. Once they lure a victim into the rear yard they use cell phones to communicate between the male(s) in the rear yard and the actor who enters the house. Other ploys have females asking for help in catching their runaway cat that is supposedly in the victim’s rear yard. The cons to enter the house usually consist of actors claiming to be selling something door to door, taking some type of survey to looking for an address on the street. Actor will ask for drink of water or to look at a phone book or ask for a pen and paper in order to leave a note for a neighbor. Once they can get into the house they will try to steer the victim into the kitchen while another suspect goes to the bedrooms. Do not open your door to strangers or persons claiming to be utility workers who are at your house for some type of inspection, especially if you did not set up the inspection or were informed of it in advance by the utility company. The legitimate employee not only has ID but will have a vehicle that bears the name and logo for the utility company they represent. Police officers will immediately respond to your residence if you call about a suspicious person or doubt the legitimacy of a utility company worker. If you believe a person at your house is attempting to commit one of these types of crimes, contact the police immediately via 9-1-1 or (973) 376-0400.


Links


ID Theft


Home Security

HOME SECURITY:

Invest in it now… If you were locked out of your house, would you still be able to get in? Maybe you keep an unlocked window in the back, or a hidden key in the mailbox or on top of a window ledge? You may think this is a good idea, but guess what? If you can break in, so can a burglar! One out of ten homes will be burglarized this year. For a small amount of time and money you can make your home more secure and reduce your chances of becoming a victim.

Check the Locks!

Make sure every external door has a sturdy, well-installed dead bolt lock. Key-in-the-knob locks alone are not enough. Sliding glass doors can offer easy access if they are not properly secured. You can secure them by installing commercially available locks or putting a broomstick or dowel in the inside track to jam the door. To prevent the door being lifted off the track, drill a hole through the sliding door frame and the fixed frame. Then insert a pin in the hole. Lock double-hung windows with key locks or “pin” windows by drilling a small hole into a 45 degree angle between the inner and outer frames, then insert a nail that can be removed. Secure basement windows with a grille or grates. Instead of hiding keys around the outside of your home, give an extra key to a neighbor you trust. When you move into a new house or apartment, re-key the locks.

Check the Doors!

All outside doors should be metal or solid wood. If your doors don’t fit tightly in their frames, install weather-stripping around them. Install a peephole or wide-angle viewer in all entry doors so you can see who is outside without opening the door. Door chains break easily and don’t keep out intruders.

Check the Outside!

Thieves hate bright lights. Install outside lights and keep them on at night. Keep your yard clean. Prune back shrubbery so it doesn’t hide doors or windows. Cut back tree limbs that a thief could use to climb to an upper-level window. Clearly display your house number so police and other emergency vehicles can find your home quickly. If you travel, create the illusion that you’re at home by getting some timers that will turn lights on and off in different areas of your house throughout the evening. Lights burning 24 hours a day signal an empty house. Leave shades, blinds, and curtains in normal positions. And don’t let your mail pile up! Call the post office to stop delivery or have a neighbor pick it up. Ask local law enforcement for a free home security survey.

Consider an Alarm!

Check with several companies before you buy so you can decide what level of security fits your needs. Do business with an established company and check references before signing a contract. Learn how to use your system properly! Don’t “cry wolf” by setting off false alarms. People will stop paying attention and you will probably be fined. Some less expensive options…a sound-detecting socket that plugs into a light fixture and makes the light flash when it detects certain noises, motion-sensing outdoor lights that turn on when someone approaches, or lights with photo cells that turn on when it’s dark and off when it’s light.


Domestic Violence

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE…The Hidden Crime VOLUNTEERS NEEDED – VIOLENCE RESPONSE TEAM As many as four million women in this country suffer some kind of domestic violence at the hands of their husbands or boyfriends each year. Very few will tell anyone…a friend, a neighbor, or the police. Victims of domestic violence come from all walks of life, all cultures, all income groups, all ages, and all religions. They share feelings of helplessness, isolation, guilt, fear, and shame.
Are You Abused?
Does the person you love:

  • “Track” all of your time?
  • Constantly accuse you of being unfaithful?
  • Discourage your relationships with family and friends?
  • Prevent you from working or attending school?
  • Criticize you for little things?
  • Anger easily when using alcohol or other drugs?
  • Control all finances and force you to account in detail for what you spend?
  • Humiliate you in front of others?
  • Destroy personal property or sentimental items?
  • Hit, punch, slap, kick, or bite you or your children?
  • Use or threaten to use a weapon against you?
  • Threaten to hurt you or your children?
  • Force you to have sex against your will?

If you find yourself saying yes to any of these — it’s time to get help!
Don’t Ignore the Problem Talk to someone. Part of the abuser’s power comes from secrecy. Victims are often ashamed to let anyone know about intimate family problems. Go to a friend or neighbor, or call a domestic violence hotline to talk to a counselor. Plan ahead and know what to do if you are attacked again.

If you decide to leave:

 

  • choose a place to go;
  • set aside some money.
  • Put important papers together — marriage license, birth certificates, checkbooks — in a place where you can get them quickly.
  • Learn to think independently.
  • Try to plan for the future and set goals for yourself.

 

If You Are Hurt, What Can You Do?
There are no easy answers, but there are things you can do to protect yourself…Call the Police.
Assault, even if by family members, is a crime.
The police often have information about shelters and other agencies that help victims of domestic violence.
Leave!

  • Or have someone come and stay with you.
  • Go to a battered women’s shelter — call a crisis hotline in your community or a health center to locate a shelter.
  • If you believe that you, or your children, are in danger — leave immediately!
  • Get medical attention from your doctor or a hospital emergency room.
  • Ask the staff to photograph your injuries and keep detailed records in case you decide to take legal action.
  • Contact your family court for information about a civil restraining order that does not involve criminal charges or penalties.

Nationwide Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)


Home Repair Fraud

CRIME PREVENTION TIPS…Home Improvement & Repair Fraud Natural disasters usually bring out the best in people, as neighbors and strangers reach out to help each other.
Unfortunately, these same disasters also bring out individuals who prey on those who have already been victimized. Some of the most common scams involve home repairs, clean-up efforts, heating and cooling equipment, and flood damaged cars.
The Springfield Police Crime Prevention Unit suggests that you take precautions and make informed decisions…
Precautions You Can Take! Check with your insurance company about policy coverage and any specific filing requirements that the company may have.
Although you may be anxious to get things back to normal, avoid acting in haste.
Don’t be pressured into signing long-term contracts. Make temporary repairs if necessary.
Be wary of door-to-door workers who claim your home is unsafe. If concerned about possible structural damage in your home, have an engineer, architect or building official inspect it.
Prepare a written agreement with anyone you hire.
Never pay for repairs in advance and never pay cash; use a check or money order!
Always get several estimates for any repair job. Be sure to compare prices and contract terms.
Ask for references AND check them out.
Contact your local Better Business Bureau to check out a company’s reputation before you authorize any work or pay out any money. Additional Resources… 1. Better Business Bureau / 973-581-13132. Consumer Affairs / 973-508-62003. Federal Trade Commission / 202-382-4357{2jtab: Unwanted Marketing} {2jtab: Auto Theft}

DON’T MAKE IT EASY FOR A THIEF TO…STEAL YOUR WHEELS

One vehicle is stolen every twenty (20) seconds in the United States. Stolen cars, vans, trucks, and motorcycles cost victims time and money — and increase everyone’s insurance premiums. They’re also often used to commit other crimes. Don’t become a victim of this serious crime…

The Basic Prevention Policy…

  • Never leave your car running or the keys in the ignition when you’re away from it, even if its “just for a minute.”
  • Always roll up the windows and lock your car, even if it’s in front of your house.
  • Never leave valuables in plain view, even if your car is locked. Put them in the trunk or at least out of sight.
  • Buy radios, tape and CD players that can be removed and stored in the trunk.
  • Park in busy, well-lighted areas.
  • Carry the registration and insurance card with you.
  • Don’t leave personal identification documents or credit cards in your vehicle.
  • When you pay to park in a lot or garage, leave just the ignition key with the attendant.
  • Make sure no personal information is attached.
  • Do the same when you take your car for repairs.

What About Carjacking??

Carjacking — stealing a car by force — has captured headlines in the last few years.
Statistically, your chances of being a carjacking victim are very slim, and preventive actions can reduce the risk even more…

  • Approach your car with the key in hand.
  • Look around and inside before getting in.
  • When driving, keep your car doors locked and windows rolled up at all times.
  • Be especially alert at intersections, gas stations, ATMs, shopping malls, convenience and grocery stores — all windows of opportunity for carjackers.
  • Park in well-lighted areas with good visibility, close to walkways, stores, and people.

If the carjacker has a weapon, give up the car with no questions asked.
Your life is worth more than your car.


Unwanted Marketing

UNWANTED MARKETING AND SOLICITATIONS:

(Annoyance Protection) With the proliferation of real name fraud (see our Identity Theft tips page), unsolicited mail offerings and unsolicited telemarketing, the following information is provided for your safety and convenience…

Pre-Approved Offers of Credit

To have your name removed from PRE-APPROVED OFFERS OF CREDIT lists provided by Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, call 888-567-8688.
This action will reduce the amount of unsolicited mail offers of credit that you receive.

Telemarketing Firms

To have your name and phone number removed from lists provided to TELEMARKETING FIRMS you must make your request in writing.
Your request must contain your name, any other names you use or have used (Miss Jane Smith, Mrs. Jane Smith, Ms. Jane Smith, etc.), address and telephone number.

Send your request to…
Telephone Preference Service
Direct Marketing Association
PO Box 9014
Farmingdale NY 11735-9014

Direct Mail Marketing

To have your name and address removed from lists associated with DIRECT MAIL MARKETING you must make your request in writing. Your request must contain your name, other names you use or have used, and your address.

Send your request to…
Mail Preference Service
Direct Marketing Association
PO Box 9014
Farmingdale NY 11735-9014


Auto Theft

DON’T MAKE IT EASY FOR A THIEF TO…STEAL YOUR WHEELS One vehicle is stolen every twenty (20) seconds in the United States. Stolen cars, vans, trucks, and motorcycles cost victims time and money — and increase everyone’s insurance premiums. They’re also often used to commit other crimes. Don’t become a victim of this serious crime…

The Basic Prevention Policy…

  • Never leave your car running or the keys in the ignition when you’re away from it, even if its “just for a minute.”
  • Always roll up the windows and lock your car, even if it’s in front of your house.
  • Never leave valuables in plain view, even if your car is locked.
  • Put them in the trunk or at least out of sight.
  • Buy radios, tape and CD players that can be removed and stored in the trunk.
  • Park in busy, well-lighted areas.
  • Carry the registration and insurance card with you.
  • Don’t leave personal identification documents or credit cards in your vehicle.
  • When you pay to park in a lot or garage, leave just the ignition key with the attendant.
  • Make sure no personal information is attached. Do the same when you take your car for repairs.

What About Carjacking??

Carjacking — stealing a car by force — has captured headlines in the last few years.
Statistically, your chances of being a carjacking victim are very slim, and preventive actions can reduce the risk even more…
Approach your car with the key in hand. Look around and inside before getting in.
When driving, keep your car doors locked and windows rolled up at all times.
Be especially alert at intersections, gas stations, ATMs, shopping malls, convenience and grocery stores — all windows of opportunity for carjackers.
Park in well-lighted areas with good visibility, close to walkways, stores, and people.
If the carjacker has a weapon, give up the car with no questions asked. Your life is worth more than your car.


Alcohol Awareness

ALCOHOL IS NUMBER ONE…Alcohol is the number one drug of choice for teenagers. Alcohol related car crashes are the number one killer of teenagers in the United States. Alcohol is the number one drug problem in America. If you think it can’t happen to you, look around.
Check your school’s yearbooks for the last ten years. How many have been dedicated to a student who was killed in a drunk driving crash? Ask your friends how many people they know who have had bad things happen to them while they were drinking. You don’t even have to be the one doing the drinking — most teenage passenger deaths are the result of alcohol-impaired teenage drivers.

How Does Alcohol Affect You?

You see double, speech slurs, you lose your sense of distance. Alcohol loosens inhibitions; you make bad judgements that can result in car crashes, unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, or rape. A significant proportion of violent crimes and vandalism among and by youth involve alcohol. Using alcohol can cost you your freedom. You can be grounded by parents, lose your driver’s license, or even end up in jail. Some More Facts About Alcohol Drinking coffee, taking a cold shower, or breathing fresh air will not sober you up. The only thing that sobers you up is time. One beer, one shot of whiskey, and one glass of wine all have the same amount of alcohol. Don’t fall for the notion that beer and wine are less intoxicating than hard liquors. Only 3-5% of alcoholics are what we think of as bums. Most alcoholics are just like people you know. Anyone can become an alcoholic — young, old, rich, poor, married, single, employed, or out of work. The earlier young people start drinking and using drugs, the more likely they are to become addicted. Alcohol ages and damages the brain.

For Information…

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)P.O. Box 2345Rockville, MD 20852 1-800-SAY-NO-TO, 1-301-468-2600, 1-800-662-HELP


Miscellaneous

Forms

We currently have a Civilian report that can be filled out and left at our Headquarters for follow up. (See forms below. We currently have Alarm Registration form that can be dropped off at a our Records Department. We currently have parking permit applications that can be filled out and dropped off at our Records Department. Click here for Civilian reports For Civilian reports please follow the instructions printed on the top of the report. Please remember that the reports cannot be mailed or faxed to our Headquarters. They need to be delivered in person.

INSTRUCTIONS: Print or type all information. Complete all applicable blocks. The Victim is the owner of the property that was stolen, lost or damaged. Indicate date and time of incident. If unknown, check ‘Between’ and write in the upper set ofblocks the date and time the item was last seen and write in the lower set of blocks the date and time the item was first known to be missing or damaged. Complete remainder of blocks including a description of the property stolen or damaged, and a detailed explanation of what occurred. The description of the property must include the make, model, color, serial number (where applicable) and dollar value of each item. If more room is needed use the reverse side of this form. The victim or person reporting the incident must sign this report and return it in person to the Police Desk. This report may be given to the desk officer at any time, however, UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES IS THIS REPORT TO BE MAILED OR FAXED TO POLICE HQ. This report MUST be returned in person.

Scroll down for forms download list: Alarm Registration form Alarm Ordinance Alarm applications are due each January of the year to be registered. All alarm applications have a $15.00 fee and all checks must be made out to the Township of Springfield. The applications may be mailed. Mailing address is: Township of Springfield 100 Mountain Ave. Springfield, NJ 07081 Attention: Records Department


Alarms Ordinance

Explanation: This Ordinance amends Chapter XVII of the Revised General Ordinances of the Township of Springfield entitled, “Alarm Systems” by amending various portions of said Chapter.

TOWNSHIP OF SPRINGFIELD ORDINANCE NO. 2013-12 BE IT ORDAINED, by the Township Committee of the Township of Springfield, County of Union, State of New Jersey that Chapter XVII of the Revised General Ordinances of the Township of Springfield entitled, Alarm Systems” is hereby amended as follows:

SECTION I – AMENDMENT
Chapter XVII entitled “Alarm Systems” is hereby amended by ( i ) inserting references to “local alarm systems”;
(b)
deleting references to “warning devices”; (c) deleting references to “permit” and “permittee” and replacing them
with references to “registration” and “registrant”, respectively; (d) deleting Article II, entitled “Alarm Panel”, in its
entirety; and re- numbering the Articles of the Chapter accordingly; (e) deleting references and matters pertaining to
alarm panels; (f) amending the wording of Section 17-18, entitled “Violations and Penalties”, regarding the penalties
for false/accidental alarm activations in excess of three such activations in one calendar year. Amended Chapter
XVII shall read as follows:

CHAPTER XVII ALARM SYSTEMS

Article I General Provisions

17-1 FINDINGS AND DECLARATIONS.

The Township Committee hereby finds and declares that:

a. Alarm systems and devices to detect and report emergencies such as burglary and fire have been installed in numerous residential, commercial and industrial premises in the Township.

b. Unless the various systems and devices of the many alarm companies are uniformly regulated, there will be unnecessary drain on the manpower, time, space, facilities and finances of the Township and
its public safety departments; deterioration of the quality o£ and inefficiency in, the service to persons subscribing to the alarm services; and confusion or inequities among the alarm companies in the Township.

c. The public interest, therefor, requires the enactment of standards, procedures and regulations to control the use of private emergency alarm systems and devices in the Township.

17-2 PURPOSE.
The purpose of this section is to provide standards, procedures and regulations for various types of burglar, fire and other private or local alarm systems which require a response by the Police Department,
Fire Department or other Township agency.

17-3 APPLICABILITY.

The provisions of this section shall apply to any person, other than the Township, who operates, maintains or owns any private or local alarm system designed to summon the Police Department, Fire Department or other Township agency to any location in response to the signal of any type of emergency alarm. This section shall not be construed to prohibit alarm companies from providing alarm services to other offices within or without the Township. No person shall have premises protected by a private or local alarm system unless the alarm system is registered in accordance with this section.

17-4 DEFINITIONS.

As used in this section: False alarm shall mean the actuation of an alarm system or warning device by causes other man those to which the alarm system or warning device was designed or intended to respond, or the testing of alarms required by law or practice without prior notice to the Police Department Licensee shall mean the person obtaining the license to install, operate and maintain the alarm. Local alarm shall mean any device installed to serve an improved property and designed to sound an alarm by a bell, horn, siren or other noisemaking instrument located upon the property where the device is installed and audible beyond the limits of the property in the event of the presence of fire, smoke or similar hazards, unauthorized entry, the commission of an unlawful act or any one (1) or more of the foregoing. Any equipment which combines the characteristics of a private alarm system and a “local alarm” shall be classified as a private alarm system for the purposes of this section. Registrant shall mean any person owning or leasing a private or local alarm system and holding a registration submitted pursuant to this section, Private alarm system shall mean any system installed to serve an improved property and designed to use for detection of fire, smoke or similar hazards, the detection of unauthorized entry or commission of any unlawful act or the detection of any one (1) or more of the foregoing, or for reporting an emergency, which system communicates or causes the communication of information to the alarm panel in the Township’s Police Department. A “private alarm system” includes a Telephone call system (also known as a “central station system”) which automatically alerts a person beyond the limits of the property served who is engaged in the business of relaying information by telephone to the Township Police Department or reacting independently of the police.

17.6 RESERVED. Article II Private Alarm Systems

17-7 REGISTRATION REQUIRED.

No person shall install, maintain or use, or cause or permit to be used, any private alarm system within the Township unless a registration has been submitted to the Chief of Police of the Township in accordance with the provisions of this chapter. No person shall use a private alarm system during any period when the registration has expired or is suspended.

17-8 APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION

Any person desiring to use a private alarm system upon improved property owned or occupied by such person shall submit a written application to the Chief of Police. The application shall be on forms to be furnished by the Chief of Police, which shall require the following information over the signature of the applicant:

a. The name, address and telephone number of the applicant

b. The location of the property to be served.

c. The name, address and telephone number of the company which will furnish and maintain the private alarm system.

d. The name and telephone number of a person to be notified of a faulty private alarm system at any time when no one is present on the property served by the system. The applicant has an affirmative duty to notify the Township in writing within three (3) days of a change in the information required herein.

e. The particular type of private alarm system for which the registration is sought

f. Consent to inspection of the premises on which the private alarm system is installed at reasonable hours by the Police Chief or a designated representative.

17-9 FEES.

17-9.1 To the Township.

At the time an application is submitted and by January 15 of each year as long as the registration is in force, the registrant shall pay to the Township of Springfield an annual fee of fifteen ($15.00) dollars.

17-9.2 No Proration Delinquent Fees.

Any registration submitted between January 1 and October 15 shall require the same fees, no portion of which shall be prorated, but the fees shall be refunded to the applicant in the event the registration is not accepted. Any registration issued between October 15 and December 31 shall be valid until December 31 of the following year. If the registrant shall fail, neglect or refuse to comply with registrant’s obligation to pay the annual fee, the registrant shall be considered in violation of this chapter and subject to the penalties outlined in section 17-18.

17-10 REGISTRATIONS.

17-10.1 Investigation and Registration.

The Chief of Police shall not accept a registration for a private alarm system if the Chief finds that the system covered by the application does not meet applicable standards. Whenever the Chief of Police
shall refuse to accept a registration, the Chief shall advise the applicant in writing of the reason or reasons for refusal.

17-10.2 Expiration of Registration.

Every registration submitted for a private alarm system shall expire on December 31 of the year in which it was issued, with the exception of those registrations submitted between October 15 and December 31, which shall be valid until December 31 of the following year.

17-10.3 Terms and Conditions of Registration.

All registrations for private alarm systems shall be issued upon the following terms and conditions:

a. A registration shall be issued for each separate improved property; store, building or other facility,

and no registration shall be transferred or assigned in any manner.

b. If required, an applicant shall furnish complete information and specifications for the system. Such information shall include specific data relating to testing procedures and the prevention of false alarms.

c. Each person or separate business entity shall have a single registration. If the alarm covers an area of more than ten thousand (10,000) square feet, unless, waived by the Chief of Police the applicant shall provide an annunciator mechanism at a place approved by the Chief of Police indicating the location of the emergency.

d. Every registration shall be subject to rules and standards which may be promulgated by the Chief of Police with respect to private alarm systems. Such rules shall be in writing and shall be given to each registrant at the time of registration or renewal of any registration or at time of promulgation or amendment.

17-10.4 Suspension of Registration.

a. Any registration issued for a private or local alarm system may be suspended by the Chief of Police if it shall appear that:

1. The registrant has failed to comply with the terms and conditions of the registration or has failed to comply with rules and standards promulgated by the Chief of Police with respect to private or local alarm systems;

2. The registrant or any agent knowingly installed or maintained a faulty private or local alarm system; or

3. The registrant or any agent failed to comply with a request by the Chief of Police to render necessary services to a faulty private or local alarm system within eight (8) hours after such request was made or Med to disconnect such system within such period and until such system has been repaired. b. Four (4) false alarms within a calendar year period constitute prima facie evidence that a private or local alarm system is faulty and is in violation of this chapter and the registrant shall be subject to the penalties outlined in section

17-18. In the case of false alarm, any person having knowledge thereof shall immediately notify, by the quickest means available, the Police or the Fire Department. In addition, in case of false alarms, the Police Chief shall cause an investigation to be made and keep a record of the false alarms on file. If, in the event of a false alarm, the Police Department is advised of the name, address, preassigned code number and that the alarm is false before police or fire vehicles or personnel arrive at the scene, the false alarm, in the discretion of the Police Chief or a designee, may be deemed not to be a false alarm. If, in the event of the testing of a private alarm system or local alarm, the police receives prior notice of at least five (5) minutes before each test, the alarm will not be deemed a false alarm.

17-11 RESERVED. Article IV Local Alarms

17-12 REGISTRATION OF LOCAL ALARMS

17-12.1 Registration. Every person who installs, maintains or uses a local alarm within the Township shall notify the Chief of Police of such device by completing and filing with the Chief of Police a form to be furnished by the Chief of Police providing for the following information:

a. The name, address and telephone number of the owner or occupant of the property served by the warning device.

b. The location of the property served and the location of the device on the property.

c. The name, address and telephone number of any company installing or maintaining the alarm device.

d. The type of device.

e. The name and telephone number of a person to be notified of a faulty local alarm at any time when no one is present on the property served by the local alarm. There shall be an affirmative duty upon the applicant to notify the Police Chief, in writing, within three (3) days of a change in the information required in this section.

17-12.2 Inspection.

Owners of local alarms, upon registration, shall be deemed as having consented to inspection of the premises in which the alarm devices are installed, at reasonable hours by the Police Chief or any designated representatives. Owners of local alarms shall be governed by the false alarm procedure set forth in subsection 17-18

17-11.4.

All local alarms shall be equipped with a time relay or battery to limit the sounding of alarms to fifteen (15) minutes or less.

17-13 RESERVED.

Article V Miscellaneous

17-14 PROPER MAINTENANCE OF PRIVATE SYSTEM OR LOCAL ALARMS. Every person who installs, maintains or uses a private or local alarm system to serve an improved property within the Township shall maintain it in good repair and proper working condition, shall meet the standards which may be promulgated by the Police Chief to prevent faulty systems or devices and shall promptly correct or disconnect any faulty system or device upon notice from the Chief of Police that the system or device is sounding an inordinate number of false alarms, and upon a . failure to respond to the notice to comply, such person shall be in violation of this chapter.

17-15 CUTOFF FOR SOUNDING DEVICE.

Every private or local alarm system which has a sounding device shall be equipped with a cutoff mechanism which will terminate the sound after fifteen (15) minutes.

17-16 APPEALS.
Any person aggrieved by the action of the Chief of Police in the acceptance, denial or suspension of a registration for a private alarm system or with respect to the installation, operation or maintenance of any alarm equipment shall have the right of appeal to the Township Committee. The appeal shall be taken by filing with the Township Clerk, within fourteen (14) days after the notice of the action complained of has been mailed to the person’s last known address, a written statement setting forth fully the grounds for appeal. The Township Clerk shall schedule such appeal at the next Township Committee meeting and notice of the hearing shall be given to the applicant by certified mail to his last known address at least three (3) days prior to the date set for hearing. The decision of the Police Chief shall be affirmed, modified
or reversed, and the reasons therefor shall be set forth in a written communication to the applicant.

17-17 DISCLAIMER OF RESPONSIBILITY.

The Township of Springfield and the Springfield Police Department shall not assume any responsibility whatsoever to any licensee, registrant, or other person with respect to the adequacy, operation or maintenance of any private alarm system or warning device. No action taken by the Township or the Township’s Police Department pursuant to the provisions of this chapter shall create any liability upon either the Township or the Township’s Police Department by reason of any failure of any private alarm system or warning device and any failure to respond to any private alarm system or warning device. Every registrant who submits a registration for a private or local alarm system or registers a warning device agrees to hold and save harmless the Township and its Police Department, their agents and employees from any liability whatsoever in connection with the alarm system or warning device.

17-18 VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES.

The Township will allow up to three (3) false/accidental alarm activations without penalty per calendar year. Penalties for additional false/accidental activations are as follows: 4th, 5th and 6th activations – $50.00 per occurrence 7th, 8th, and 9th activations – $75.00 per occurrence 10th activation and each activation thereafter – $100.00 per occurrence Penalty for unregistered alarms – $50.00 The above violations are billable offenses bv the Police Department/Township. Failure to remit payment of a bill within 30 days will result in the issuance of a summons requiring a mandatory appearance in the Springfield Township Municipal Court.

SECTION II – RATIFICATION

Except as expressly modified herein, all other provisions and terms of the Code of the Township of Springfield shall remain in full force and effect.

SECTION III – SEVERABILITY

In case any section, subsection, paragraph, subdivision, clause or provision of this ordinance shall be judged invalid by a court of competent jurisdiction, such order or judgment shall not effect or invalidate the remainder of any section, paragraph, subdivision, clause or provision of this ordinance, and to this end, the provisions of each section, paragraph, subdivision, clause or provision of this ordinance are hereby declared to be severable.

SECTION IV – REPEAL

Any ordinance or portion of any ordinance which is inconsistent with the modifications of this ordinance is repealed to the extent of its inconsistency.

SECTION V – EFFECTIVE DATE

This ordinance shall take effect immediately upon passage and publication according to law.

Linda M. Donnelly, does hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance was introduced for first reading at the Regular Meeting of the Township Committee of the Township of Springfield,
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, and that said Ordinance shall be submitted for consideration and final passage at a regular meeting of said Township Committee to be held on May 28, 2013, Springfield Municipal Building at 7:30 p.m., at which time and place any person or persons interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said Ordinance. Copy is posted on bulletin board in office of the Township Clerk.

Linda M. Donnelly, RMC

Township Clerk

The Local Source

May 9, 2013

Click here to download a copy of the Application for Alarm Registration

Fees:


National Night Out

National Association of Town Watch

What is National Night Out?It’s America’s Night Out Against Crime! The “28th Annual National Night Out” (NNO), a unique crime/drug prevention event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch (NATW), has been scheduled for Tuesday, August 2, 2011. We cordially invite you and your community to be a part of our NIGHT OUT 2011 team. Last year’s National Night Out campaign involved citizens, law enforcement agencies, civic groups, businesses, neighborhood organizations and local officials from over 15,000 communities from all 50 states, U.S. territories, Canadian cities and military bases worldwide. In all, over 37 million people participated in National Night Out 2010.NATIONAL NIGHT OUT is designed to: Heighten crime and drug prevention awareness;Generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime programs;Strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; andSend a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back.Click here to find out more about the history of NATW and National Night Out.

Along with the traditional display of outdoor lights and front porch vigils, cities, towns and neighborhoods ‘celebrate’ NNO with a variety of events and activities such as:

block parties,cookouts,visits from local police and sheriff departmentsparades, exhibits,flashlight walks,contests, andyouth programs.NNO has proven to be an effective, inexpensive and enjoyable program to promote neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships in our fight for a safer nation. Plus, the benefits your community will derive from NNO will most certainly extend well beyond the one night.

The official 2011 NNO Registration form is available on this site. Simply complete the online form and submit it.

(Note: There is no cost to register or participate!)Once registered, coordinators receive an ORGANIZATIONAL KIT filled with ‘how-to’ materials such as: promotional ideasguidelinestipsquestions and answerscamera-ready artsample news releases and proclamationsYou will also receive NNO “Updates” during the period leading up to the event. Plus, you’ll receive information on “Project 365” – a unique component to the National Night Out campaign. Don’t delay. Be sure your community is part of the nation’s largest annual crime/drug prevention event. Complete and submit the NNO 2011 Registration form today.
National Night Out — A Great Value There are no financial barriers to participating in National Night Out. That always has been our commitment, but in today’s difficult economy, it’s worth highlighting . We know communities and local law enforcement agencies are being asked to justify every expense. National Association of Town Watch (NATW), the sponsoring organization of National Night Out, partners with Target Corporation and law enforcement agencies to make sure there are no financial barriers to participating in National Night Out. NATW continues to operate as a lean organization. We are thoughtful about how every dollar is spent, working year-round to help city governments, police departments and grassroots organizers make their National Night Out events successful and their communities better places to live.Thank you in advance for your interest, support and early response.


National Take Back Initiative

NATIONAL TAKE BACK INITIATIVE

APRIL 30, 201110:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Find a collection site near youThis initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. More than seven million Americans currently abuse prescription drugs, according to the 2009 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health.
 
Each day, approximately, 2,500 teens use prescription drugs to get high for the first time according to the Partnership for a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including the home medicine cabinet.
In an effort to address this problem, DEA, in conjunction with state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the United States, conducted the first ever National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, September 25, 2010.
 
The purpose of this National Take Back Day was to provide a venue for persons who wanted to dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs. This effort was a huge success in removing potentially dangerous prescription drugs, particularly controlled substances, from our nation’s medicine cabinets. There were approximately 3,000 state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the nation that participated in the event. All told, the American Public turned in more than 121 tons of pills on this first National Take Back Day.Due to the overwhelming success of the first event, DEA has scheduled the second National Prescription Drug Take Back Day which will take place on Saturday, April 30, 2011, from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm. This is a great opportunity for those who missed the first event or who have subsequently accumulated unwanted, unused prescription drugs, to safely dispose of them.

 

Police Department Forms

 
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Form SP-66 (96.7 KB)